Skip to main content
Menu
We're on 9500 Spencer Highway
La Porte TX 77571
Home » Eyeglasses & Contacts » Prescription Eyeglasses

Prescription Eyeglasses

eyeglassesAll About Lenses

At

Bifocal Lenses

Sometimes our vision fails us at two or even three distinct distances, especially as we age. Bifocal lenses—lenses with two distinct viewing areas—have traditionally been a reliable solution to such a dilemma, and could be suggested at your eye exam. (A lens with three distinct viewing areas is called a trifocal.)
 
By distinct, we mean there are noticeable lines separating the two different fields of vision within a bifocal lens surface. A slight adjustment to the angle of the head allows wearers to choose which lens area to look through based on the distance of the object they’re trying to see.
 
A farsighted person who also has trouble reading may be prescribed a pair of bifocal reading glasses, for example. The upper section of the lens would correct difficulties seeing objects at distance, and the lower section would assist in reading. (Bifocal glasses date back to the days of Benjamin Franklin!)
 
While wearers quickly adjust to the line separating the multiple vision fields, it is a noticeable distraction within the lens itself. This line can be eliminated using a newer lens technology called progressive lenses.
 
Progressive lenses incorporate two, three, or more fields of vision within a single lens without noticeable lens lines. Bifocal, trifocal and progressive lenses are all considered “multi-focal” lenses—lenses that provide correction to multiple vision problems.
 

High Index and Aspheric Lenses

What are High Index Lenses?

high index lens is a lens that has a higher “index” of refraction. This means it has a greater ability to bend light rays to provide clear vision for people with stronger prescription glasses. But that’s the technical terminology. What do high index lenses mean for eyeglass wearers in La Porte?

Thinner, lighter, and more visually appealing, that’s what! High index lenses are manufactured to be thinner at the edges of the lens and lighter in weight overall.

High index lenses are a good option for people who have been given strong prescriptions from their eye doctor for myopia—commonly called “nearsightedness” due to a difficulty in focusing on far objects. A high-index lens can bend light rays more, while using less material in lenses created for both nearsighted and farsighted people (hyperopia).

No more soda bottle glasses

In times past, strong prescriptions meant thicker, heavier lenses, giving some a “glass bottle” appearance. But now, with high index glasses available in thinner, lightweight plastic (as well as slightly heavier glass), lens wearers with stronger prescriptions can get more attractive, yet equally effective, lens products at our Photochromic lens technology has been around for over 40 years. Photochromic lenses change from clear to dark based on the intensity of UV radiation. Remove the source of UV radiation from the lenses, and they return to their clear state.

young woman wearing sunglassesThe amount of photochromic reaction (how much a lens darkens) depends upon the intensity of the UV radiation present, combined to a lesser extent with the current temperature of the air. That means photochromics adjust automatically to indoor and outdoor light conditions. Photochromic lenses automatically adjust to outdoor lighting conditions by providing the right level of tint, and return automatically to their clear state; both indoors and at night.
 
Watch a short video on photochromic lenses:

Polycarbonate Lenses

Our Referred to as "no-line" bifocals or trifocals, progressive glasses are ideal for patients who have presbyopia —a vision condition marked by a decrease in the ability to focus sharply on nearby objects.

As we age naturally, our ability to see nearby objects and objects in the distance can decrease. Progressive lenses address separate visual needs in one lens—usually with a “distance viewing” field build into the upper portion of the lens, and a “near vision” field built into the lower portion.

Unlike traditional bifocals or trifocals, there are no visible lines separating the different fields of a progressive lens. Your eyes are seen clearly behind the progressive eyeglasses, you’ve got the same “look” as eyeglass wearers often half your age, and there are no “lens lines” to distract your vision.

Watch a short video about Progressive Lenses:

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today! 

 

  • So often, one pair of eyeglasses simply can’t do it all. Watch a short video about the benefits of having a second pair!
  • These lens care and maintenance tips will go a long way toward maintaining your healthy sight.
  • Which frame material is right for you? Learn about the different types of metal and plastic, and the advantages of each.
  • Tips for Keeping Your Frames Properly Maintained.